Benjamin Shin: Defining Mentorship

Here is Dr. Benjamin Shin’s plenary session message “Defining Mentorship,” at the Asian American Ministry Conference, November 8, 2014. Benjamin C. Shin has served in the ministry as a pastor, parachurch leader, and professor for more than 20 years.  He is a graduate of UCLA, Talbot School of Theology, and Dallas Theological Seminary.  He enjoys reading, music, sports (especially the UCLA Bruins), and spending time with people.  His vision and passion includes mentoring leaders, re-building churches, and teaching the Word of God.  He is married to his bride, Jen and has 2 wonderful boys named Adam and Zachary.  He currently serves as Associate Professor of Bible Exposition and Director of the Asian-American Ministry track for the Doctor of Ministry at Talbot School of Theology in La Mirada,...

Cory Ishida: It’s All About Mentorship

Here is Rev. Cory Ishida’s plenary session message “It’s All About Mentorship,” at the Asian American Ministry Conference, November 8, 2014. Pastor Cory Ishida was born in Alhambra, CA in 1947 to Nisei (second generation Japanese American) parents. He grew up in Pasadena, CA and graduated from UCLA with a degree in zoology. Cory has been married to his wife, Reine, since 1969. They have three married daughters and ten grandchildren. Cory was called as the senior pastor of Evergreen Baptist Church of Los Angeles (Evergreen LA) in 1977. In 1997, he, along with 300 members of Evergreen LA, planted Evergreen Baptist Church of San Gabriel Valley (Evergreen SGV) located in La Puente,...

Review of Jackson Wu’s Saving God’s Face by Daniel Eng

Review of Jackson Wu’s: Saving God’s Face: A Chinese Contextualization of Salvation through Honor and Shame by Daniel Eng In Jackson Wu’s dissertation on theology with a Chinese framework, the author takes his understanding of honor-shame and applies it the gospel. He de-constructs the theology that has been heavily influenced by western thinking and guides the reader to understand the concepts of salvation from an East Asian perspective. Wu defines “honor” as the value placed upon people within their social context, and it can be ascribed by others or can be achieved (437, 438). As hard work and self-improvement are generally lauded in Asian culture, one’s honor is placed in one’s own achievements and reputation. The author then defines “shame” as ill repute on a person for failure to meet a standard issued by the community. Within the context of morality, right and wrong are discussed in terms of what is honorable or shameful among Chinese people (445). Wu points out that the Chinese concept of honor is similar to the understanding of biblical writers in discussing the gospel. While western constructions of the gospel are centered around law and judgment (545), the East Asian viewpoint shifts the focus onto the group. In reflecting on my own journey, I see how the communication of honor-shame has been more compelling to me than guilt. I suspect that many Asian Americans would, as I do, relate more to the older brother than the younger brother in the parable of the Prodigal Son. Both sons’ interactions with the Father brought shame upon the community. The older brother’s words focused on the guilty...